Estate Planning Information Session

31 October 2018

Are You Playing Musical Chairs with
Your Family and Your Finances?

If you are one of the 69% of people who don’t even have a will, then you are going to get caught without a chair, which means conflict and court for the people you love!

Or maybe you do have a will, but you don’t know that a will alone is simply not enough to make sure your family will stay out of court and conflict if you become incapacitated or when you die.

6 Key Steps For Conscious Co-Parenting: Part Two

17 September 2018

Last week, we shared the first part of this series, discussing some of the key steps for conscious co-parenting. In part two, we continue with the final steps. Today, many married couples who decide to end their marriages choose conscious divorce. However, once the divorce is finalized, you must continue using the same positive approach in your joint-parenting efforts.

Avoid This Major Mistake When Adding an IRA to Your Estate Plan

4 September 2018

Avoid This Major Mistake When Adding an IRA to Your Estate Plan
 

Some people assume that because they’ve named a specific heir as the beneficiary of their IRA in their will or trust that there’s no need to list the same person again as beneficiary in their IRA paperwork. Because of this, they often leave the IRA beneficiary form blank or list “my estate” as the beneficiary.

But this is a major mistake—and one that can lead to serious complications and expense.

The Seller Disclosure Act

21 May 2017

The Seller Disclosure is a form that is statutorily required when there is a transfer of real estate. There are a few instances of transfers that do not require the disclosure form, but those are in very specific situations. Generally, the Seller Disclosure form is required.

The Seller Disclosure Act requires the seller to make a statement that discloses all of the conditions of and information about the property. This information is based on good faith, meaning that the seller is only required to disclose of information that he/she is aware of at the time of disclosure. The seller may be required to make additional disclosures after the delivery of the statement if the seller, prior to the transfer of the property, becomes aware of additional conditions. If the condition is dangerous, then the seller may be held liable for any injuries that occur due to the condition.

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